Planning Minutes – 07/03/08

Comments Off on Planning Minutes – 07/03/08

NWDA Planning Cte July 3, 2008

John Bradley, Bill Welch, Larry Westerman, Don Genasci, Kevin Kenaga, Lois Kincaid, Tavo Cruz, Dick Singer, Ron Walters, Vanessa Cass, Stephen Metzler, Juliet Hyams, Allan Classen, Jeff Love, Greg Theisen, Pete Colt, Ryan Yaden, Kara Fioravanti.

Jeff Stuhr, Holtz Architecture. Irving Street Garage

Since last year’s appeal, have modified to work with safety issues. Split zone, governed by CS. Behind Papa Hayden’s. Besides the philosophical debate about whether a garage goes in the neighborhood, most of the discussion was around the issue of safety. Met with neighborhood representatives. Stepped back 2’ in front, added several safety features, for ped safety. Eliminated pilaster in center, a couple of speed bumps, automated arm, textured ramp—stopping automobile before it enters the public sidewalk. A doorbell sound to alert pedestrians has been added. Landscaping, planters to separate cars and pedestrians.

Reduced top level, more like a two-story building on that side, down now to 87 parking spaces. Increased bicycle parking from the required 2 to 10 (8 additional behind storefront.)
Gate closure.
Setback 2’ entire West façade, not just the street level.
Working with neighbors, raised parapet slightly adjacent to Dr. Ferguson’s back yard and around.

Could have or remove eastern pilaster on west portion of the building façade.

Some possible disagreements about aesthetics vs safety, want to hear input.

Working with Dr. Ferguson, next door, the original 4.5’ has been squared off to reach 5.5 to 6’.

Genasci—asks distance—Stuhr: 26’ from front and first parking stall.
Welch—not possible to do a single in/out door?

Stuhr—the problem is stacking both inside and outside. Had tried to separate the two driveways before, but PDOT wanted only one point of ped/auto interaction.

Genasci—one of major concerns is elevation coming down street towards 23rd. We’ll see a great big blank wall. If the whole entry was pushed back (doesn’t need to be inside) at least on the first level.

Stuhr—two levels above, it’s the driveway aisle that’s needed there.

Genasci—no transition between the houses and the commercial street. That transition would be facilitated by pushing back the façade. It does address one of the major issues.

Stuhr—the toughest part of this garage is of course the ramping; we have them pushed to the maximum so the angle can still be parked on. Not so much an issue of losing a couple of parking spaces, but pushing back the ramps makes them too steep to park on, doors would fly open into the adjacent car. At 4 % slope for these sections.

Stapleton—like at Westerly, could have setback graduated toward the line, door pushed back, might have to move stairway.

Stuhr—this is complicated by the crossover situation.

Yaden—If you erode the lower floor you can float the concrete slab, bike parking inside might come outside, and if you could then somehow change the stairs to being horizontal, would ease the transition back to the adjacent house.

Stuhr—the Music Millennium building is taller than this & goes directly into the residential area, this pattern does exist in the core.

Genasci—that doesn’t make it a wonderful transition, it’s on you to make this better. There are places, old gas station, with cutbacks, which make that wall far more sympathetic.

Metzler—are two stairwells required by code? Yes.

Westerman—do they need to be closed? No, would if residential.

Stuhr—re cutback, more difficult than existing examples which have public ROW on two sides, this is adjacent to neighboring house, would need to work with him. It has its challenges.

Cass—How does pushing the building back 2’ make is safer? I still need to pull out almost into the sidewalk to see traffic and could still have problems with pedestrians.

Stuhr—in Pearl and Downtown, building frontage on the sidewalk with direct pull-out. In this design, as drivers approach the street they leave the building edge and have a broader field of view.

Pete Colt—this neighborhood has a history of rape & crime, drug dealing and transients. Where will the security shack be, gate to shut the garage?

Stuhr—6 am to midnight, roll down doors at closing. Drivethrough security guard, not onsite, cameras.

Colt—cameras don’t prevent, only help after the fact.

Welch—likes the column at the doorway.

Bradley—what about the modifications? Windows into garage area, don’t count towards needed.

Stuhr—there’s not an active use requirement here. By taking the building down, less facing NW 23rd. This area technically requires windows (facing 23rd above Papa Haydens) but we’ve invested in the look with textured brick, can’t even see that from the street.

Brick goes all the way around the building, soldier coursing & Flemish pattern.

Stapleton—how can you build this without access to neighboring property?

Stuhr—we can lay the brick from our side but have been discussing some access through the property. If we weren’t allowed access it complicates it but still could be done.

Kenaga—doesn’t see the current lot as being full, why take away that for this new structure?

Stuhr—this is a significant investment, but it’s new and it takes time for people to get used to going to that area. The garage can also service the apartments with overnight parking (monthly users would have secure access.) E.G. William Sonoma lot didn’t fill for a long time.

Singer—the Glisan parking took a while to be utilized.

Kurt Schultz, SERA Architects. Park Apartments, 19th between Glisan and Hoyt.

Presents new drawings. Here last Thursday, Type II mods. Was asked to bring back more detail on architectural grilles, alternative for air conditioning in individual units.

Heard last week that there wasn’t interest in going to large HVAC approach, but concerns about quality an sheer number of grilles. Ran this past Tim Heron at the City. Bradley asked for clarification of where the grilles go.

Decided to go with Regio decorative scroll grilles, which we’ve used on restoration projects, e.g. Pioneer Courthouse. Illustrates some in the neighborhood> didn’t want to go with a blade grille.

We’ve re-arranged the grilles to make them as hidden as possible, and reduced the number. In the efficiency apartments we’re using natural air.

Moved the grilles so they are between two brackets on the top level, otherwise none on the stucco façade facing Couch Park (West face.) Will be finished and powder coated to match the façade, so will only see the dark opening.

On East face, we located the grilles on inside corners tucked in next to bay windows to hide them from Hoyt & Glisan, again color matched. Upper level similar to West face.

On short walls (North and South faces) we have none on the top level, and tucked them into areas on these faces. Have eliminated around 30 of these grilles, moved most of the rest. Tim Heron is reviewing and is expected to come back with comment next week.

Fioravanti—most concerned about those on the stucco wall, why not in the wood panels so as not to break up the stucco. Doesn’t like the aesthetics.

Genasci—could they go on the side of the bays?

Schultz—will consider. Will need to see if it’s physically possible.

Yaden—you actually see them more (there are some in the Pearl.)

Welch—how is noise with many small units vs HVAC?

Schultz—noise is about the same, the concern is all the additional screening & height on the roof.

Colt—take out middle row of balconies, to open up the building.

Bradley—comments due? –this Monday? Would still like to see the drawings before we vote on this.

Schultz—I will ask Tim Heron for an extension. I’ll put together a package to send out on Monday.

Bradley—so let’s postpone a decision, and I’ll get back to Kurt on Monday and call downtown (Tim.)

Schultz—quick update on NW 19th, Lovejoy & Kearney. Screening Room site. Some existing buildings from 1930 not on resource list (outside alphabet district) built for the movie industry. Stucco & cast form concrete Mediterranean style. Corner building is two story with red tile roof. Developer has an option on this site, and still hasn’t decided whether to move forward.

Could do a 7 story building, could technically wipe the site clean. We talked last time about what portions you would like to preserve, and I heard you preferred to keep the corner building, and perhaps some design elements.

We decided to save and preserve the corner building, restore it. Possibly take some design elements from the other buildings.

(Presents some ‘flavor’ sketches.) Got to 55’ (not full allowed 75’) and create a ‘Mediterranean village’ retail and housing complex. T-shaped apartments 4 stories over 1 floor retail, T to the North, create a new patio courtyard to entry of apartments. 19th & Lovejoy build out with retail (TBD) can’t take vehicular access on Lovejoy, hard on 19th so would be from Kearney, below grade. 90 units, so maybe 50 stalls. Loading dock below grade.

If we do move forward, I’ll certainly be coming back to you. At the preapp the bureaus were supportive.

Wouldn’t go to Landmarks commission, as not in historic district. We are sort of pretending this is, as it’s almost across the street.

Noell Elliot, the planner was encouraging more build out and more glass and steel ‘more like the Pearl’. The developer doesn’t like this approach.

Colt—flavor is too much like California.

Genasci—this is the most difficult thing to do, to reconstruct adjacent style on new. If you could save more space on Kearney and larger on Lovejoy, could be far more solid with this scale but not like a Pearl building. Don’t think it’s possible to do a knock off of the original.

Walters—aren’t there others in the neighborhood in this style? (Yes near Couch Park.) Could echo these and still have a good building.

Schultz—this is overdrawn, we want to complement not compete with the old building.

Yaden—feel free to do a different style than the ones you just mowed down. Would like to see full height on Lovejoy.

Genasci—but the corner building does need a bit more context, as on Kearney.

Planning Minutes – 7/3/08

Comments Off on Planning Minutes – 7/3/08

NWDA Planning Cte July 3, 2008

John Bradley, Bill Welch, Larry Westerman, Don Genasci, Kevin Kenaga, Lois Kincaid, Tavo Cruz, Dick Singer, Ron Walters, Vanessa Cass, Stephen Metzler, Juliet Hyams, Allan Classen, Jeff Love, Greg Theisen, Pete Colt, Ryan Yaden, Kara Fioravanti.

Jeff Stuhr, Holtz Architecture. Irving Street Garage

Since last year’s appeal, have modified to work with safety issues. Split zone, governed by CS. Behind Papa Hayden’s. Besides the philosophical debate about whether a garage goes in the neighborhood, most of the discussion was around the issue of safety. Met with neighborhood representatives. Stepped back 2’ in front, added several safety features, for ped safety. Eliminated pilaster in center, a couple of speed bumps, automated arm, textured ramp—stopping automobile before it enters the public sidewalk. A doorbell sound to alert pedestrians has been added. Landscaping, planters to separate cars and pedestrians.

Reduced top level, more like a two-story building on that side, down now to 87 parking spaces. Increased bicycle parking from the required 2 to 10 (8 additional behind storefront.)
Gate closure.
Setback 2’ entire West façade, not just the street level.
Working with neighbors, raised parapet slightly adjacent to Dr. Ferguson’s back yard and around.

Could have or remove eastern pilaster on west portion of the building façade.

Some possible disagreements about aesthetics vs safety, want to hear input.

Working with Dr. Ferguson, next door, the original 4.5’ has been squared off to reach 5.5 to 6’.

Genasci—asks distance—Stuhr: 26’ from front and first parking stall.
Welch—not possible to do a single in/out door?

Stuhr—the problem is stacking both inside and outside. Had tried to separate the two driveways before, but PDOT wanted only one point of ped/auto interaction.

Genasci—one of major concerns is elevation coming down street towards 23rd. We’ll see a great big blank wall. If the whole entry was pushed back (doesn’t need to be inside) at least on the first level.

Stuhr—two levels above, it’s the driveway aisle that’s needed there.

Genasci—no transition between the houses and the commercial street. That transition would be facilitated by pushing back the façade. It does address one of the major issues.

Stuhr—the toughest part of this garage is of course the ramping; we have them pushed to the maximum so the angle can still be parked on. Not so much an issue of losing a couple of parking spaces, but pushing back the ramps makes them too steep to park on, doors would fly open into the adjacent car. At 4 % slope for these sections.

Stapleton—like at Westerly, could have setback graduated toward the line, door pushed back, might have to move stairway.

Stuhr—this is complicated by the crossover situation.

Yaden—If you erode the lower floor you can float the concrete slab, bike parking inside might come outside, and if you could then somehow change the stairs to being horizontal, would ease the transition back to the adjacent house.

Stuhr—the Music Millennium building is taller than this & goes directly into the residential area, this pattern does exist in the core.

Genasci—that doesn’t make it a wonderful transition, it’s on you to make this better. There are places, old gas station, with cutbacks, which make that wall far more sympathetic.

Metzler—are two stairwells required by code? Yes.

Westerman—do they need to be closed? No, would if residential.

Stuhr—re cutback, more difficult than existing examples which have public ROW on two sides, this is adjacent to neighboring house, would need to work with him. It has its challenges.

Cass—How does pushing the building back 2’ make is safer? I still need to pull out almost into the sidewalk to see traffic and could still have problems with pedestrians.

Stuhr—in Pearl and Downtown, building frontage on the sidewalk with direct pull-out. In this design, as drivers approach the street they leave the building edge and have a broader field of view.

Pete Colt—this neighborhood has a history of rape & crime, drug dealing and transients. Where will the security shack be, gate to shut the garage?

Stuhr—6 am to midnight, roll down doors at closing. Drivethrough security guard, not onsite, cameras.

Colt—cameras don’t prevent, only help after the fact.

Welch—likes the column at the doorway.

Bradley—what about the modifications? Windows into garage area, don’t count towards needed.

Stuhr—there’s not an active use requirement here. By taking the building down, less facing NW 23rd. This area technically requires windows (facing 23rd above Papa Haydens) but we’ve invested in the look with textured brick, can’t even see that from the street.

Brick goes all the way around the building, soldier coursing & Flemish pattern.

Stapleton—how can you build this without access to neighboring property?

Stuhr—we can lay the brick from our side but have been discussing some access through the property. If we weren’t allowed access it complicates it but still could be done.

Kenaga—doesn’t see the current lot as being full, why take away that for this new structure?

Stuhr—this is a significant investment, but it’s new and it takes time for people to get used to going to that area. The garage can also service the apartments with overnight parking (monthly users would have secure access.) E.G. William Sonoma lot didn’t fill for a long time.

Singer—the Glisan parking took a while to be utilized.

Kurt Schultz, SERA Architects. Park Apartments, 19th between Glisan and Hoyt.

Presents new drawings. Here last Thursday, Type II mods. Was asked to bring back more detail on architectural grilles, alternative for air conditioning in individual units.

Heard last week that there wasn’t interest in going to large HVAC approach, but concerns about quality an sheer number of grilles. Ran this past Tim Heron at the City. Bradley asked for clarification of where the grilles go.

Decided to go with Regio decorative scroll grilles, which we’ve used on restoration projects, e.g. Pioneer Courthouse. Illustrates some in the neighborhood> didn’t want to go with a blade grille.

We’ve re-arranged the grilles to make them as hidden as possible, and reduced the number. In the efficiency apartments we’re using natural air.

Moved the grilles so they are between two brackets on the top level, otherwise none on the stucco façade facing Couch Park (West face.) Will be finished and powder coated to match the façade, so will only see the dark opening.

On East face, we located the grilles on inside corners tucked in next to bay windows to hide them from Hoyt & Glisan, again color matched. Upper level similar to West face.

On short walls (North and South faces) we have none on the top level, and tucked them into areas on these faces. Have eliminated around 30 of these grilles, moved most of the rest. Tim Heron is reviewing and is expected to come back with comment next week.

Fioravanti—most concerned about those on the stucco wall, why not in the wood panels so as not to break up the stucco. Doesn’t like the aesthetics.

Genasci—could they go on the side of the bays?

Schultz—will consider. Will need to see if it’s physically possible.

Yaden—you actually see them more (there are some in the Pearl.)

Welch—how is noise with many small units vs HVAC?

Schultz—noise is about the same, the concern is all the additional screening & height on the roof.

Colt—take out middle row of balconies, to open up the building.

Bradley—comments due? –this Monday? Would still like to see the drawings before we vote on this.

Schultz—I will ask Tim Heron for an extension. I’ll put together a package to send out on Monday.

Bradley—so let’s postpone a decision, and I’ll get back to Kurt on Monday and call downtown (Tim.)

Schultz—quick update on NW 19th, Lovejoy & Kearney. Screening Room site. Some existing buildings from 1930 not on resource list (outside alphabet district) built for the movie industry. Stucco & cast form concrete Mediterranean style. Corner building is two story with red tile roof. Developer has an option on this site, and still hasn’t decided whether to move forward.

Could do a 7 story building, could technically wipe the site clean. We talked last time about what portions you would like to preserve, and I heard you preferred to keep the corner building, and perhaps some design elements.

We decided to save and preserve the corner building, restore it. Possibly take some design elements from the other buildings.

(Presents some ‘flavor’ sketches.) Got to 55’ (not full allowed 75’) and create a ‘Mediterranean village’ retail and housing complex. T-shaped apartments 4 stories over 1 floor retail, T to the North, create a new patio courtyard to entry of apartments. 19th & Lovejoy build out with retail (TBD) can’t take vehicular access on Lovejoy, hard on 19th so would be from Kearney, below grade. 90 units, so maybe 50 stalls. Loading dock below grade.

If we do move forward, I’ll certainly be coming back to you. At the preapp the bureaus were supportive.

Wouldn’t go to Landmarks commission, as not in historic district. We are sort of pretending this is, as it’s almost across the street.

Noell Elliot, the planner was encouraging more build out and more glass and steel ‘more like the Pearl’. The developer doesn’t like this approach.

Colt—flavor is too much like California.

Genasci—this is the most difficult thing to do, to reconstruct adjacent style on new. If you could save more space on Kearney and larger on Lovejoy, could be far more solid with this scale but not like a Pearl building. Don’t think it’s possible to do a knock off of the original.

Walters—aren’t there others in the neighborhood in this style? (Yes near Couch Park.) Could echo these and still have a good building.

Schultz—this is overdrawn, we want to complement not compete with the old building.

Yaden—feel free to do a different style than the ones you just mowed down. Would like to see full height on Lovejoy.

Genasci—but the corner building does need a bit more context, as on Kearney.

Transportation Minutes – July 2, 2008

Comments Off on Transportation Minutes – July 2, 2008

NWDA Transportation Committee
Meeting Notes
July 2, 2008
Meeting location: NW Library
Time: 6:00pm

Members present: Sharon Kelly, Bud Clark, Devin Liebmann, Jeanne Harrison, Scott Seibert, and Kim Carlson.

Guests present: Greg Aldrich, Stephen Sykes (BES), Jim Ferguson, Jean Senechal Biggs (PDOT), Todd Liles (PDOT), Alan Jones, Don Singer, Dick Singer, Juliet Hyams, Jeff Stuhr, Steve Townsend (PDOT)

Steve Townsend presented a plan for reconstructing Twenty-third Avenue while balancing integrity of the existing underground pipes, the need to replace and repair failing underground services, and concerns of the neighborhood businesses and residents. The plan calls for doing the sewer work now, giving the neighborhood a break from city construction crews until September 09 when the water repair work would be done, and then reconstructing the travel lanes in 2 block segments closed to entirely to car traffic with the sidewalks remaining open. This work would be done between January and June of 2010, with a full resurfacing of the travel and parking lanes at the end of that time. The reconstruction area is from Burnside to Lovejoy and corner curb ramps will be brought up to ADA code as part of the project.

A motion was made by Scott Seibert, seconded by Sharon Kelly, to support the Twenty-third Avenue reconstruction plan that allows Sunday construction hours and extended Monday through Friday construction hours and proposal to do the work in 2010. The motion was unanimously approved.

Jeff Stuhr, architect from Host Architecture, presented the proposed Irving Street Parkade modified to address pedestrian safety concerns expressed by the neighborhood at City Council last year. Modifications include a 15% reduction in the number of parking spaces; 2’ front setback on the residential half of the building; the option of removing an architectural column to increase field of vision for exiting drivers and passing pedestrians; glass across the entire front side street level adds to the field of vision; interior pavement change, 2 speed bumps, and a traffic gate for exiting cars. An audible alert will be installed. The developer welcomed the participation of neighbors when setting the volume for this alert. Bike parking for 12 bikes will be installed in the garage. This is 10 more than required by the city code.

Those present were generally impressed with the attention to pedestrian safety and the attractive design. Jim Ferguson, expressed concern for his own home foundation during construction. He lives next door to the building site.

While members of the Transportation Committee do not support additional parking garages in NW Portland, or the removal of housing, they recognize that a former City Council created this unfortunate circumstance and are willing to move on. The Committee members present expressed a need to work with the City Council and the Planning Bureau to prevent future split zoning.

The Committee proposed removing on-street parking on the North side of Irving between 23rd Ave. and the garage entrance and replacing it with a curb extension with a bike port and stormwater bio-swale. All agreed this would enhance visibility near the garage entrance/exit, add much needed bike parking on 23rd Avenue, and provide a wider pedestrian right of way in this area. Mr. Singer expressed his willingness to work with the neighborhood and the City to replace on-street parking on Irving between 23rd Ave and the garage entrance with a curb extension that would include a bike port.

A motion was made by Scott Seibert and seconded by Sharon Kelly to recommend approval of the proposed Irving Garage design presented; that it meets neighborhood concerns about safety; and for reasons of safety we recommend leaving out the center column. Further, we will work with the city, the developer and the neighborhood to replace on street parking on Irving between 23rd Avenue and the garage driveway for a curb extension and installation of a bike port. The motion carried with 4 in favor, 1 opposed, and 1 abstention.